The New Yorker – Doubting “Darwin’s Doubt”

The New Yorker has an interesting and well written blog article by Gareth Cook that reviews the new Discotute tome Darwin’s Doubt – Doubting Darwin’s Doubt. Cook places the book and Meyer’s argument in the context of the history of Intelligent Design creationism as a cynical rebranding exercise aimed at inveigling creationism back into American schools after a series of legal setbacks for creationists. Well worth reading. Cook notes the odd approach of ID creationists – that scientific understanding of the world and universe has reached its limits, and that what is left can only be explained by the interventions of God a supernatural designer:

Most absurd of all is the book’s stance on knowledge: if something cannot be fully explained by today’s science—and there is plenty about the Cambrian, and the universe, that cannot—then we should assume it is fundamentally beyond explanation, and therefore the work of a supreme deity.

Darwin’s Doubt may well have entered the New York Times hardback bestseller list (oddly, I think this is in the non-fiction section), but amongst those who know an understand science, and particularly those disciplines related to evolutionary biology, it’s very unlikely to gain any traction.

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